MPs and peers to investigate scale of cyber security threat to UK

Written by Rebecca Hill on 11 January 2017 in News
News

The Joint Committee on National Cyber Security Strategy has launched an inquiry to assess how prepared the government is for cyber attacks and how it can build resilience.

A map of the world in binary

The inquiry will look at how the UK's cyber security measures up in a digital world - Photo credit: Pixabay

The UK National Security in a Digital World inquiry will look at the types and sources of cyber threats in faced by the UK and whether the UK has committed sufficient human, financial and technical resources to dealing with these threats.

Committee chairwoman Margaret Beckett said that although the "digital revolution has opened up a whole host of opportunities, it has also created new vulnerabilities" and that the national security implications are a matter of "increasing concern".

Among the questions the committee's inquiry will ask is whether the latest cyber security strategy, which was published in November and focuses on defence, deterrence and innovation, is fit for purpose, and if the government has learnt the right lessons from the previous strategy.

The strategy, to be funded with £1.9m between 2016-10, sets out three main lines of work: strengthening the UK’s defences in both the private and public sectors; deterring attacks with strong policies on cyber crime that are actively enforced; and developing the nation’s capabilities s it can keep pace with new threats.


Related content

“Active cyber defence”: UK’s first National Cyber Security Centre chief sets out strategy
Labour MP says Brexit could mean ‘exit for tech’ when it comes to data
Whitepaper: Transforming public sector productivity


The joint committee has asked for submissions that consider the effectiveness and coherence of the strategic lead provided by the National Security Council, departments, agencies, and the National Cyber Security Centre, which was officially opened last summer.

It also asks how the government can work with the private sector to build up cyber skills, and how it can work with allies and partners to develop capabilities, set standards and share intelligence.

Other areas of work will look at the government’s relationship with the private sector on cyber security, including on the balance of responsibilities for protecting national infrastructure and the right level of regulation and legislation for companies.

In December, the government published its Cyber Security Regulation and Incentives Review, which looked at regulation for companies and found a “strong justification” to secure personal data through regulation.

However, it said this would only be done through the implementation of the European Union General Data Protection Regulation, which comes into force in 2018, adding that the government “will not seek to pursue further general cyber security regulation for the wider economy over and above the GDPR”.

The deadline for submissions is 20 February.

Share this page

Tags

Add new comment

Related Articles

HMRC tax return HMRC claims digital tax success as personal registration exceeds 7m target
17 February 2017

There were 7.4 million people using a digital personal tax account by the end of 2016 – 400,000 more than its initial target – according to HMRC’s quarterly performance figures.

GCHQ National Cyber Security Centre: ‘Entirely possible to build secure tech in an agile way’
15 February 2017

The UK’s National Cyber Security Centre has revealed how it built its new IT systems using an agile approach, saying that waterfall “was never going to bring this job in on time”.

scientists, user, science, data, analytics HMRC seeks “visionary” data exploitation director as part of big data plans
14 February 2017

HMRC is advertising for a director to lead its data strategy and help personalise customers’ interactions with services, as the tax authority reveals more details of its behavioural insights work...

Justice scales and books Government to trial online conviction for fare evasion as part of digital justice reforms
13 February 2017

The Ministry of Justice is pushing ahead with plans that will allow people to plead guilty online and immediately pay a standard fine for certain offences.