Newcastle and Northumberland agreed shared-services plan for council tax and benefits

Written by Sam Trendall on 17 January 2018 in News
News

Establishing united team of 400 workers will save each authority an estimated £300,000 a year

Credit: Owen Humphreys/PA Archive/PA Images

Newcastle City Council and Northumberland County Council have confirmed plans to share a range of digital and physical services.

The two authorities are to create a single team of about 400 people to jointly deliver “transactional” services to citizens across both areas. Services covered by the arrangement, a number of which are delivered wholly or partially online, will include individual and business taxes, benefits payments, and staff payroll. 

Workers will be in the employ of Northumberland, with about half of the total number set to be transferred under Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) regulation from the city to the county council. A formal consultation process for affected staff – involving council and union representatives – is ongoing. The aim is for the shared services to go live by 1 April, with employees moved into a new shared office space over the summer.


Related Content


Each authority spends about £11m a year on transactional services. Over the next three years the two expect to save £895,000 apiece by adopting shared services. 

Newcastle’s cabinet member for resources, councillor Veronica Dunn, said: “Over the last seven years government cuts have had a profound effect on councils up and down the country. As a result, they have had to explore new ways of providing services. Newcastle has a proud record of finding innovative ways of doing more with less. Coming together with our neighbours in Northumberland will, I believe, deliver savings that can be reinvested back into sustaining vital public services that people depend upon."

Northumberland’s cabinet member for corporate services, councillor Nick Oliver, said: “All councils continue to face significant pressures to reduce costs, while at the same time continuing to provide essential high-quality services to our communities and our residents. By exploring opportunities to provide joint financial services, this will help us to look at ways we can continue to achieve high quality frontline services in a cost-effective and more efficient way.”

 

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

Share this page

Tags

Categories

Add new comment

Related Articles

DWP in-house IT company BPDTS appoints Loveday Ryder as CEO
12 January 2018

First set of annual accounts for BPDTS Ltd reveal that company delivered more than £12m of IT services to department in first four months of existence

The art of designing a rational service for irrational taxpayers
8 January 2018

Dacorum Borough Council in Hertfordshire has redesigned its council tax service to better work with ‘the quirks of how we actually think’. Gill Hitchcock finds out more

Driverless pods, smart sensors, and citizen apps – inside the plan to future-proof Milton Keynes
4 January 2018

In a town gaining 40,000 extra citizens each decade, the council's strategy chief Geoff Snelson tells PublicTechnology why smart-city ideas and technology need to be an...

Whitehall signs up to avoid all-male tech shortlists
31 January 2018

All government departments will sign the Tech Talent Charter, including a pledge to submit anonymised diversity data

 

Related Sponsored Articles

Who keeps your organisation secure?
19 February 2018

BT's Amy Lemberger argues that having the right security in place to protect your organisation is no longer just an option. It is a necessity.

WATCH: Digital transformation - the key to success or a security risk too far?
13 February 2018

BT brought together some their top security experts and CIOs from well known UK organisations to discuss digital transformation and the impact that it’s having on organisations