Government to trial ‘noise cameras’ to crack down on loud vehicles

Written by Sam Trendall on 10 June 2019 in News
News

Technology will measure sound levels to try and identify law-breakers

Credit: Your Best Digs/CC BY 2.0

The government is to trial the use of so-called ‘noise cameras’ in a bid to crack down on excessively loud vehicles.

The technology will measure sound levels of passing traffic. It could also, according to the Department for Transport, incorporate the use of automated number plate recognition cameras to enable prosecution of those whose vehicles exceed legal noise limits.

“Currently, enforcement is mainly reactive and relies on subjective judgement,” the DfT said. “The trials of the new technology will determine whether the legal noise limit has been breached by taking into account the class and speed of the vehicle relative to the location of the noise camera.”


Related content


The DfT claimed that the trials are “not intended to target law-abiding drivers”.

“Noise cameras could work like speed cameras to target law-breaking drivers automatically,” the department added.

This could include motorists who rev their engine, or those who have modified their vehicles with illegal exhausts.

The pilot schemes, which will involve the deployment of a prototype specially commissioned by the government, are likely to take place at “several locations” around the UK between now and the end of 2019.

Transport secretary Chris Grayling said: “Noise pollution makes the lives of people in communities across Britain an absolute misery and has very serious health impacts. This is why I am determined to crack down on the nuisance drivers who blight our streets. New technology will help us lead the way in making our towns and cities quieter, and I look forward to seeing how these exciting new cameras could work.”

 

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

Share this page

Tags

Categories

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.

Related Articles

Analysis: gaps in procurement transparency are nothing new
26 February 2021

The health secretary cited the demands of coronavirus response after being rapped for failing to meet publication deadlines for major contracts. But perusing procurement databases suggests this is...

Digital identity plans to promote 'vouching' by professionals
11 February 2021

Government will set legal requirements for digital identity providers rather than consider national identity cards

Interview: How digital had 'a ringside seat' in Singapore's pandemic response
4 February 2021

The Singaporean government’s response to Covid-19 has made extensive use of digital, devices, and data – not always uncontroversially. PublicTechnology talks to Kok Ping Soon, the...

How digital services kept the DVLA on the road during 2020
6 January 2021

Chief executive Julie Lennard on the role of tech in responding to the pandemic, and how people’s expectations of online tools have changed

Related Sponsored Articles

How Your Privacy Program is a Competitive Differentiator
29 January 2021

OneTrust presents the reasons why your organisation should invest in privacy management - and offers three easy tips for getting started 

Email security incidents happen every 12 hours – it’s time to close the gap in Microsoft 365
21 January 2021

The remote-first world has seen email being relied on more than ever as a core communication mechanism - but with 93% of IT leaders acknowledging a risk to sensitive data, what steps should be...

How digital is helping Defence Medical Services re-imagine HM Armed Forces healthcare
3 February 2021

Defence Medical Services (DMS) is pursuing ground-breaking digital, data and technology transformation which will revolutionise Tri-Service healthcare provision to over 135,000 Armed...

Are You Ready for the Future of Cyber Security?
15 January 2021

2020 was a cyber security wake up call for many organisations. Attempting to provide secure remote access and device flexibility quickly exposed the flaws in legacy systems and processes. As we...