Inspector sought to examine plane crash data

Written by Sam Trendall on 30 July 2021 in News
News

Air Accidents Investigation Branch offers role gathering data on incidents

Credit: Pixnio

The UK’s official investigator of plane crashes and other incidents is recruiting for an inspector to gather and analyse data.

The Air Accidents Investigation Brach, an agency of the Department for Transport, is seeking to appoint an air accidents inspector for recorded data.

The successful candidate will address “all recorded data aspects of an aircraft accident or serious incident”. Responsibilities include retrieving data and equipment from the site of accidents, and then subsequent “recovery and replay of recorded data, extraction and analysis of data from a variety of sources”.

“This will include the recovery and analysis of information recorded on damaged or undamaged flight recorders and other avionic systems, as well as externally recorded data from radar, surveillance video and witnesses’ devices,” the AAIB said. “You will also lead the search for recorders following accidents to aircraft that have become submerged in the sea, by using state of the art underwater location equipment.”


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Inspectors will initially debrief the organisation’s chief inspector, and may then be required to give evidence to coroner’s courts, and to work with accident-investigating bodies in other countries.

The data gathered, meanwhile, will be used in “assessing aircraft performance, culminating in the drafting of safety recommendations and reports”.

Applicants are advised that, alongside technical skills, they will also require the sensitivity needed in dealing with those affected by accidents.

“The role involves liaison with technical personnel from aircraft manufacturers, operators, maintainers, and regulators for both the investigation and future development in recorded data capabilities,” the advert said. “Due to the nature of AAIB operations, you will be exposed to situations, information and material of a sensitive or traumatic nature (video, photographs) and recordings which may be distressing. You will be required to speak with potentially traumatised accident victims and witnesses, as well as bereaved relatives, using tact and compassion.”

The role, which will be based in Aldershot in Hampshire, comes with an annual salary of between £74,485 and £81,933. After two years, and subject to satisfactory progress, this will rise by £4,000, alongside a promotion to senior inspector. A further four years’ service will lead to another £2,000 pay bump and a role as lead inspector.

Applications are open until 27 August.

 

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Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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