IoT firms offered government-backed support

Written by Jenni Davidson on 15 February 2021 in News
News

Scottish companies given chance to access programme of guidance on a range of issues

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New support is available to help Scottish companies develop secure internet of things products and services.

IoT Secure is being run by CENSIS, Scotland's innovation centre for sensing, imaging and internet of things, with funding from Scottish Enterprise and the Scottish Government.

It will provide cybersecurity advice and guidance for businesses of any size, whether they are already involved in the creation of IoT devices or looking to incorporate IoT into their services.

Over the next nine months, CENSIS will provide successful companies with one-to-one cybersecurity consultations, offering guidance on best practice, legislation, manufacture and design.

While early-stage assistance is open to all participants, start-ups and SMEs can also qualify for a bespoke support package, including technical expertise from CENSIS’s engineering team to address specific aims or challenges.


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Businesses taking part in the programme can also receive support with applications for other initiatives, such as grant funding and test and certification schemes, as well as introductions to potential partners for future collaborative research projects.

IoT Secure forms part of the wider IoT Cyber Challenge programme, which was launched at the CENSIS Technology Summit in November 2019.

The initiative aims to stimulate the creation of new, secure IoT products and services.

Activities in the programme have included tailored workshops and an SME accelerator challenge.

Cade Wells, CENSIS business development manager and cybersecurity lead, said: “Cybersecurity and IoT development go hand-in-hand, and it’s essential that companies looking to develop new technologies, or introduce it to their workplaces, also consider the security of their systems.

“There is great potential for Scottish businesses of all sizes and stages to use IoT to boost processes and fuel growth and development, and our new programme is designed to help them realise that potential.

“There is no one-size-fits-all approach to cybersecurity and IoT, so we will work closely with chosen companies to develop a bespoke programme of support to meet their needs.

“Start-ups and early-stage companies are encouraged to apply, as they can also benefit from further support that goes beyond the initial consultation, helping to meet specific goals.”

Hosted by the University of Glasgow, CENSIS works in partnership with a range of academic institutions and is a registered charity funded by various sources of public money, including the Scottish Funding Council.

 

About the author

Jenni Davidson is a journalist at PublicTechnology sister publication Holyrood, where a version of this story first appeared. She tweets as @HolyroodJenni.

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