Start-ups chosen for govtech accelerator programme

Written by Sam Trendall on 8 August 2019 in News
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Latest round of Public scheme picks 14 companies – including eight from the UK – to participate

 

Credit: Public

Fourteen public sector-focused technology start-ups have been chosen for the latest iteration of the GovStart accelerator programme.

The scheme is run by specialist firm Public, which was co-founded by former 10 Downing Street deputy head of policy Daniel Korski. Since the company launched the first iteration of its accelerator programme in the UK in 2017, it has set up similar schemes in France, Germany, and Denmark.

The new cohort of start-ups – all of which specialise in technology for use in government and the public sector – marks the first time Public has run an accelerator taking in participants from multiple countries.

Korski said: “It’s been thrilling to expand GovStart from the UK across Europe. The startups joining this year’s accelerator programme in the UK, France and Germany are showing just how cutting-edge technology can improve public services and empower citizens. From a field of hundreds, the fourteen companies we’ve selected for the GovStart programme have the potential to really transform services from policing to healthcare – helping to build the future of the state.” 


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Of the 14 firms chosen for the new accelerator, eight are from the UK.

Birmingham-based Coursematch is an app that aims to help students access information about university courses. 

Bookb, meanwhile, is described as “the Netflix of books”. The platform can be used by libraries to offer a subscription delivery service – from which they gain revenue.

Mush runs a social network for mothers, Vine Health provides a tool to help cancer patients manage their medication, while Birdie specialists in connected devices for use in social care.

Other participants include the Cinapsis tool for doctors, and Unblur, a platform for use by the emergency services. 

The final member of the cohort drawn from the UK is Cyan Forensics, which has created technology designed to help the security services and law enforcement to identify and eliminate harmful content online. 

The UK start-ups will be joined by three technology offerings from Germany: the Nepos tool for helping older people use the internet; the Polyteia data-visualisation platform for local authorities; and Convaise, a chatbot also aimed at local government.

Meanwhile, Manty – which is one of three French start-ups selected – aims to help local authorities make better use of data.

Parisian firm Cap Collectif specialises in helping citizens work with the public sector to design policy, while New Vector offers secure communications tools for public bodies.
 
The 14 companies taking part began the programme with a visit to Downing Street (pictured above).

Chancellor Sajid Javid said: “The UK is Europe’s undisputed technology centre – where innovators can reinvent the way entire industries do business, while making life easier for the consumer. I’m delighted to see UK tech start-ups leading the way by using this expertise to help our public services become more efficient and focused on the people using them.”

 

 

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Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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