Website and online questionnaire lead government’s £100m drive to encourage citizens to prepare for Brexit

Written by Richard Johnstone on 3 September 2019 in News
News

Mugs and t-shirts also included as government launches official comms campaign to urge preparedness

Credit: Crown Copyright/Open Government Licence v3.0

The government has officially launched its £100m campaign to urge people to prepare for Brexit, with materials including an online questionnaire to tell people what they need to do get ready for 31 October.

A launch of a government poster on at the Westfield shopping centre in Stratford in east London marked the first public sight of the campaign, while the website gov.uk/brexit (pictured above) had launched, with a questionnaire to help people to determine what they need to do.

Details of the campaign began to emerge last week, with Michael Gove, the Cabinet Office minister who is in charge of preparations for a no-deal Brexit, signing off a communication plan to ensure members of the public and businesses are ready for the UK leaving the EU at Hallowe'en with or without a deal.

Radio and TV adverts could also follow in the weeks leading up to exit day.


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The government has also reportedly ordered t-shirts and mugs emblazoned with the 'Get Ready' message.

Launching the campaign yesterday Gove said: “Ensuring an orderly Brexit is not only a matter of national importance, but a shared responsibility. This campaign will encourage the country to come together to Get Ready for Brexit on 31 October.”

Johnson first mooted his plans for a high-profile ad blitz during the Tory leadership campaign.

In his Conservative leadership campaign, Johnson said he planned to encourage people to prepare for Brexit "in a very positive way". "From the get-go, we start saying, ‘Look, what do you need, what help do you need, what reassurances do you need?’

"Agricultural farmers in Wales... fishermen, everybody, just-in-time supply chains, here is what the government has for you, are you ready?

"And we make sure that everybody understands all the risks and eventualities, and it’s by doing that... in a really wholehearted and systematic and confident way that you, of course, minimise any disruption that might take place in the unlikely eventuality of you having to come out on WTO [World Trade Organisation] terms."

 

About the author

Richard Johnstone is deputy and online editor of PublicTechnology sister publication Civil Service World, where this story first appeared. He tweets as @CSW_DepEd.

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